EU-Canada Business Summit 2022

Description

 

The EU-Canada Business Summit is a oneday event held once a year in Brussels, capital of the European Union, that brings together hundreds of political and business decision-makers from Canada, the EU and the world.

EU and Canada have a common history, common values, a commitment to preserving and promoting the rules-based international order and have common ambitions for the future like collaboration on trade, climate change, technology, security issues, human rights, and others.

This edition’s Summit will include 5 main topics:

  • E-Commerce
  • Global Trade
  • Energy Security : Challenges & Opprotunities
  • The Future of Supply Chain
  • Economics & Finance

The EU-Canada Business Summit is a great way to built business relationships through VIP cocktails, private meetings, interactive debates and several exclusive networking activities.

 


 

Number of speakers:
6 panels with a total of 25 speakers

Number of moderator:
4

Number of participants:
350

 


 

The Future of Supply Chain

The buzz around supply chains has been intense. Pandemic disruption heightened awareness of the complexity of global supply chains and how important they are to our communities and economies. Now rising factors, including inflationary pressures, have intensified the spotlight. Supply chain leaders face fresh demands for sustainability, adaptability, and value creation—all of which can expose new risks as well as enhanced opportunities.

There are strategies to embrace, reimagine, and optimize the supply chain of the future. Expectations include digital transformation, improved sustainability, and workforce evolution, as supply chain operations adapt to meet the immediate and evolving needs of customers, employees, shareholders, and society.

 

Economics & Finance

The war in Ukraine has triggered a costly humanitarian crisis that demands a peaceful resolution. At the same time, economic damage from the conflict will contribute to a significant slowdown in global growth in 2022 and add to inflation. Fuel and food prices have increased rapidly, hitting vulnerable populations in low-income countries hardest.

Global growth is projected to slow from an estimated 6.1 percent in 2021 to 3.6 percent in 2022 and 2023. This is 0.8 and 0.2 percentage points lower for 2022 and 2023 than projected in January.

Beyond 2023, global growth is forecast to decline to about 3.3 percent over the medium term. War-induced commodity price increases and broadening price pressures have led to 2022 inflation projections of 5.7 percent in advanced economies and 8.7 percent in emerging market and developing economies—1.8 and 2.8 percentage points higher than projected last January. Multilateral efforts to respond to the humanitarian crisis, prevent further economic fragmentation, maintain global liquidity, manage debt distress, tackle climate change, and end the pandemic are essential.

 

Energy Security: Opportunities & Challenges

International collaboration successfully absorbed the demand shock that lockdowns dealt to world markets, and advanced global consensus on climate solutions. But a robust return of energy demand during the recovery and sustained weakening of oil and gas investment incentives steadily increases volatility, energy and commodity prices. As markets tighten, Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the impact of sanctions on physical and financial interactions see prices spike and inflation soar.

 

E-Commerce Trends: Powering online retail forward

Advancements in technology and the growth of available marketplaces have made it easier than ever to buy and sell online. The ecommerce market is expected to grow by almost $11 trillion between 2021 and 2025. As businesses came online during the COVID-19 pandemic, the global trend toward digitization surged ahead at lightning speed. Even as regions begin to reopen, ecommerce sales are still climbing. Global ecommerce sales are expected to reach $5 trillion in 2022, and $6 trillion by 2024.

Merchants continue to follow consumer demand online, flocking to ecommerce in record numbers. Online stores are popping up daily, with an estimated 12-24 million ecommerce sites across the globe. This means more brands competing for customers. As a result, digital advertising is more costly and less lucrative than ever before.

 

The Canada-EU partnership in a Global Trade Transition

Given the macroeconomic trends, trade growth in 2022 is likely to be lower than expected.

The most immediate economic impact of the crisis has been a sharp rise in commodity prices. Despite their small shares in world trade and output, Russia and Ukraine are key suppliers of essential goods including food, energy, and fertilizers, supplies of which are now threatened by the war. Grain shipments through Black Sea ports have already been halted, with potentially dire consequences for food security in poor countries.

How can Canada and the European Union partner, helped by CETA, to be able to efficiently respond in a rapid and global trade transition?

 

For more information on visibility opportunities and available speaking slots
please contact us at  or at +32.04.93.85.78.04

Register

Available soon

Date(s)

08 Nov 2022

Location

Cercle Royal Gaulois (In-person)

Price(s)

Free to attend

Date(s)

08 Nov 2022

Location

Cercle Royal Gaulois (In-person)

Price(s)

Free to attend

Register

Available soon

Detailed program

To be confirmed